Apple responds to Facebook's criticism of privacy
Apple responds to Facebook's criticism of privacy

Apple said in a statement that Facebook criticized the upcoming privacy changes targeting our users.

Facebook criticized Apple ahead of a future iOS update requiring users to grant permissions to apps to collect data about them.

Facebook posted ads on the news attacking Apple, claiming that the changes limited the company's ability to run private ads and effectively attract customers.

Apple said: We think this is just a matter of our users' consent. Users need to know when their data is collected and shared through other apps and websites, and they have to decide whether or not to allow it.

She added: As for the app tracking transparency feature in iOS 14, Facebook doesn't need to change the way users track and create targeted ads. Just let your users choose.

And Apple's statement said: Facebook plans to display another anti-Apple ad on Friday.

According to reports, the upcoming announcement is expected to see the iOS 14 update transform the internet as we know the situation has worsened as websites and blogs are expected to charge subscription fees. Or in-app purchases instead of posting them so that free content ads can be shown on them.

The change to data protection should originally start in the fall with iOS 14. However, it has been delayed and apps won't have to ask for user permissions until next year.

The dispute between the two companies follows Apple's addition of a new privacy label to the App Store that explains how iOS apps use your data.

In the second announcement, Facebook stepped up its ads for Apple's privacy changes. Similar ads were previously published in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times and Washington Post.

These changes affected the profitable advertising business on Facebook, which Facebook calls something bigger that could affect small businesses.

Facebook tried to convince regulators to change privacy through newspaper ads.

Facebook explained that these changes are related to moving websites and apps to a paid model as Apple takes advantage of in-app purchases and subscriptions.

Earlier this year, Facebook also criticized Apple's guidelines for its app store, praising the European Union's DMA rules and the Digital Services (DSA) rules in the hope that DMA can set limits for Apple.

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