Apple threatens to remove Amphetamine due to its name
Apple threatens to remove Amphetamine due to its name

Amphetamine, the developer of the macOS app, has claimed that Apple threatened to remove it from the Mac App Store for violating the App Store's naming guidelines, although Apple has mentioned this fact in the past. .

Amphetamines date back to 2014. It's an app that keeps your Mac awake and prevents macOS from falling asleep.

So far, the app has been on the Mac App Store for 6 years now, but due to its trademark, it looks like Apple is preparing to remove it completely from the screen.

(William Gustafson (William Gustafson)) claimed that an Apple representative called him on December 29th, threatening to remove the app from the Mac App Store.

Apple stated that the app violated app store guidelines. Unless the app is changed, it will be removed on January 12th.

The relevant guidelines state that apps that promote smoking, e-cigarette products, illegal drugs, or excessive alcohol use are prohibited in the App Store.

Requests encouraging minors to use these substances will be rejected, and the promotion of the sale of marijuana, tobacco, or controlled substances will only be permitted if an approved pharmacy is purchased.

Apple is making specific claims that the app appears to be promoting the inappropriate use of controlled substances and that the name and icon of the app refer to controlled substances.

To avoid abuse, Gustafsson has to rename amphetamines, which makes it difficult for current users to follow the app for future updates.

It will also terminate all existing brand awareness benefits as it will not carry over to the title of the new app.

The timing of the name change request is interesting as the app has been on the Mac App Store for six years.

The app has been downloaded more than 432,800 times on the US Mac App Store with a score of 4.8 (out of 5), and Apple itself has been promoting the app in the history of the Mac App Store.

Believing the app wasn't against guidelines, Gustafson wrote: I also think a lot of people want amphetamines to continue to thrive without changing the name entirely.

In all of the communications between Gustafson and Apple employees via the app for the past six years, the amphetamine name or symbol has not bothered them.

Gustafson also mentioned how amphetamine updates have been turned down in the past, but for technical reasons rather than brands.

He added: Apple is paying special attention to reviewing applications. Despite sending out 41 Apple app updates, he never asked for his name or his amphetamine code.

Apple has appealed allegations of policy breach, but the developers are not convinced that the appeal itself will reverse Apple's path.

Also, if Apple continues to make a decision, Gustafson said: It will develop a new version of the app to return to the Mac App Store as soon as possible or to raise awareness of Apple's actions and await the change at the site.

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