Google engineers are confused about Google's privacy settings
Google engineers are confused about Google's privacy settings

According to internal documents disclosed in the search giant's data collection lawsuit, Google's privacy settings not only confuse users but also employees.

A Google employee said: It looks like the current UI is designed to do things. However, according to recently leaked documents that have undergone major changes, it is difficult enough to reach people.

The lawsuit was filed in May by Arizona District Attorney Mark Bernovich, and the new information was reported in the unclassified file for the first time by the Arizona Mirror News.

Brennovic and his team wrote in the complaint that even senior Google employees do not understand the conditions under which Google collects location data.

The investigation began with an article in Arizona (Associated Press) in 2018 that indicated that Google services store location data even if you temporarily turn off the location history setting. Android or iPhone devices. .

Even if this setting is disabled, some Google apps record location and time stamp automatically.

A Google employee wrote in the posted document: I agree with the article and closing down the site means closing the site without ruling out this situation.

The search giant said it is working with an Arizona attorney general to provide documents and answer questions about Google's privacy settings that investigators have asked.

"The Privacy Policy has always been integrated into our services and our team is constantly working to improve it. The same goes for providing location information," said Google spokesman Jose Castaneda.

She added, "We have worked hard to improve privacy controls, and even these published excerpts demonstrate that the team's goal is to reduce confusion around the site's registration settings."

The way Google had hidden other websites and app activities deep into Google Account settings angered the company and prompted it to improve its way of changing privacy.

Small changes over the past two years have finally resulted in Google's current policy requiring automatic deletion of website and search history for new users.

Existing users must visit the Activity controls page to change their settings.

As Google makes the changes, it's clear that there's still a long way to go as documents from the Arizona lawsuit illustrate user confusion.


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