Google is trying to preserve the endangered languages
Google is trying to preserve the endangered languages

Google introduces the essential AI tool to protect the culture itself, giving culture a new way to protect endangered languages.

The company jointly launched the Yogambé Museum in Woolaroo, Queensland, which is an open-source web application that translates images and protects endangered languages.

The app is also available via Google Arts & Culture for Android and iOS. It uses machine learning, cloud vision, and image recognition to convert images of objects into the original language in real time.

As a user, all you have to do is point your phone's camera at something for the AI ​​to recognize and describe in a specific language along with its pronunciation.

Woolaroo's real strength lies in its openness, and the community can use it to expand its vocabulary in its own way.

If you can remember an untreated word, you can add it and pronounce it. This is especially important for languages ​​that do not contain single words describing modern concepts, such as: b. Phones or computers.

Also, when multiple objects in the image are detected, the user can scroll and select captions based on each object. If this is not accurate, you can also edit or delete the entries.

The app first discovered ten languages ​​from all over the world, including Maori, Yiddish, Yugambian, Berber and Sicilian, and it can be translated into English, French or Spanish.

UNESCO has identified that at least 2572 languages ​​(about 6000 languages) worldwide are exposed to at least some risks.

Although Woolaroo does not guarantee the continued use of these languages, it can prevent them and the history that accompanies them from gradually disappearing from people's eyes.

Google announced earlier this year that it would introduce a new feature in its Google Translate app that would allow the app to translate speech from one language to another in almost real time.

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