iPhone Error Disabling Wireless Network
iPhone Error Disabling Wireless Network

A new security flaw has appeared in Apple's iPhone. Once connected to a particular wireless access point, the vulnerability disables the device's wireless capabilities.

Once triggered, this error will prevent the iPhone from establishing a wireless network connection even if it restarts or the wireless access point has been renamed.

These vulnerabilities can be exploited by malicious actors who install fraudulent wireless access points in public places to connect to iPhone.

Reverse engineer Carl Shaw is having trouble connecting to his personal wireless access point: 


When connected to the access point, the iPhone wireless network turns off and every time you try to turn it back on, it turns off quickly, even if the device restarts or changes the name of the point.

“After joining my personal wireless network called %p%s%s%s%s%n, my iPhone permanently turned off the wireless network,” Shaw said. It cannot be fixed by restarting or changing the wireless network name.

Xu is using an iPhone XS with iOS 14.4. Tests on iPhone with iOS 14.6 confirmed that the device's wireless capabilities were disrupted after connecting to the strangely named wireless network.

iPhone error:

In several tests that tried to connect to the same wireless network, the wireless settings worked intermittently, but they all resulted in the same behavior: the iPhone wireless connection crashed.

The only way to fix broken iPhone wireless network function is to reset the device's network settings.

Remember, malicious actors can install fraudulent wireless hotspots without passwords in public places to disable iPhone.

According to users, the issue is specific to the iPhone and it seems that it cannot be replicated on Android devices.

Other security researchers who looked at Shaw's tweets believe that problems with parsing the entry could be causing this error.

And if the wireless network hotspot name contains a string with the symbol "%". iOS may incorrectly interpret the character after "%" as a string format separator if it does not.

String format specifiers have special meanings in the C programming language and its patterns. The language interpreter treats it as a variable or command name, not just a text.

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