Google is afraid of the Samsung App Store
Google is afraid of the Samsung App Store

Google uses anti-competitive practices to preemptively prevent Samsung's Galaxy Store from becoming a serious competitor to its app store.

This is based on an antitrust lawsuit by a coalition of 36 attorneys general who accused Google of illegally controlling the distribution of apps via Android.

The lawsuit also alleges that the search giant paid app developers to stop them from bypassing its stores.

The allegations challenge one of Google's main defense mechanisms against its policies, which is a violation of Apple's rules for iOS, where Android allows competing app stores and direct downloads of apps.

The lawsuit alleges that this disclosure is incorrect. This is because the customer can technically choose where to get the app. Google's business practices have prevented a viable competitor from emerging in the App Store.

The lawsuit reads: "Google felt extremely threatened when Samsung began redesigning its app store, the Samsung Galaxy Store.

The lawsuit describes Google's actions against competing stores as a threat that must be proactively eliminated.

The lawsuit describes a number of strategies the search giant allegedly used to prevent Samsung Stores from becoming viable competition.

He claims that the search giant had a revenue-sharing agreement with Android phone manufacturers that prevented initial installation on other app stores.

He also made a direct attempt to get Samsung to cut ties with major developers and reduce competition through the Samsung Galaxy Store.

Google is afraid of the Samsung Store

In addition to trying to destroy the Samsung Store, the plaintiffs also alleged that the search giant worked with app developers to encourage them not to sell their apps outside of their stores and to pay them for the apps.

The complainant argued that Google's response was a direct result of Epic Games' decision to distribute Fortnite outside the Google Play Store.

The lawsuit claims that competition in app distribution is an issue for Google that needs to be addressed.

In a blog post published shortly after the complaint was filed, the search giant's public order manager said the lawsuit was baseless and ignored the Android opening.

He said: If you can't find the app you are looking for in our store. You can download the app from a competitor's app store or from the developer's website.

He added: We will not impose any restrictions on other mobile operating systems. Manufacturers can choose to do initial installs of other app stores. Most Android devices have two or more app stores.

Epic Games made similar claims, saying the search giant took legal action against competitors' app distribution methods last year.

He claims that the search giant forced OnePlus to drop its deal in order to pre-install the Fortnite player on its phones. LG has blocked the initial installation of the Epic Games app on their devices.

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