Apple exaggerates Mac malware problems
Apple exaggerates Mac malware problems

While testing Apple Epic Games, Craig Federighi believes that strict control of the App Store is a necessary condition to keep the iPhone secure. But Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers did not believe it.

In her judgment, she wrote that for the company's benefit, Federighi may have exaggerated the reality of the Mac malware problem.

Federighi has serious doubts whether the company can protect the iPhone as it is without an app verification system.

Federighi said macOS has poor security. However, the judge believes Federigi has no evidence to support his testimony.

The judge said that although Federighi's view of the macOS malware appears reasonable. But he first appeared in the lawsuit, stating that he was exaggerating the truth in favor of the company. He said during registration that he had no data on the relative rate of malware in the registered Mac apps compared to the iOS apps.

"During this process, he admitted that the company only had tools to collect data on Mac malware, not iOS. This raises the question of how to know the relative rate," she added. Prior to this study, Apple had a long history. I think macOS can resist malware. Therefore, the court did not take Federigi's testimony seriously in this case.

The judge said Federighi tried to make macOS look bad so that iOS could shine, but there wasn't much evidence. After discussing the documentation and reviewing the app, I came to the conclusion that Apple can implement a macOS-like system without compromising iOS security.

Apple exaggerates Mac malware problems

The court found that the examination of the application can be carried out relatively independently of the distribution of the application. As Federighi noted during the trial period, once approved, the company can return the app to the developer for direct distribution or to other stores.

However, unrestricted application distribution can result in lower levels of security. Although there is no alternative model currently in use, it is easy to achieve the same goal.

It should be noted that the judge did not obligate Apple to allow the storage of alternative applications or sideloading. But his view is a sharp criticism of Apple's larger defense of its approach to locking iOS.

During this process, Epic Games argued that Apple could provide security and privacy among iOS without controlling the exclusive distribution of apps.

She suggested that the company use a Mac-like system by checking the apps before launching them and checking that they match the code they store.

However, the Mac's documentation process does not currently include all checks that are performed when apps are reviewed. In theory, this could be done if Apple so desired.

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