Europe warns Apple against using privacy to limit competition
Europe warns Apple against using privacy to limit competition

European CTO Margrethe Vestager has warned iPhone maker Apple against using privacy and security concerns to avoid competition in its App Store. CEO Tim Cook explains why users are not allowed to install software outside the App Store.

Vestag, who is also the European Commission's executive vice president, proposed a rule last year called the Digital Market Act (DMA), which would require Apple to open the App Store so users can download from the Internet or from third parties. Apps The App Store has trouble knowing it's a fringe.

Cook said at an event last month that the proposal undermines the security and privacy of the iPhone. Vestag said she was just as concerned about safety as Cook.

"I think privacy and security are of paramount importance to everyone," Vestag told Reuters. But it's also important not to use them as a competitive barrier because I believe if customers use other app stores or sideloaders, they won't give up security or privacy.

Europe warns of Apple

Vestag said he was open to changes to the proposal, which would require opinions from EU countries and EU lawmakers to become laws. "I think it's possible to find a solution to that," she said.

Vestag also clarified that Apple's privacy changes are not currently monitored. This contrasts starkly with Google's plan to block a popular web tracking tool called cookies, which was part of its investigation into Alphabet's digital promotional activities last month.

Apple introduced an iOS update in April that includes new privacy settings. These elements are designed to limit digital advertisers' ability to track iPhone users.

“I think the service from the provider is very good, and if we want to follow it outside of the app, we can simply set our preferences as long as they are the same for everyone,” said Vestag. We still have no reason to believe that Apple doesn't.

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